Topps produces full-size posters of baseball cards (Big League Stew)

An idea that seems decades overdue, Topps has begun selling the images of old baseball cards as poster-sized artwork. They have 1,035 remastered images in stock so far, in two sizes, framed or unframed, starting at $64.99. Just try and stick one in your bicycle spokes.
But wow: It’s a way for adults deemed “too old” for Fatheads (*glares at wife*) to get one of their childhood idols. It’s kind of that concept, crossed with Sports Illustrated selling framed old covers. It ought to sell. “See? It’s ART, honey!”
Via PR Newswire :
Each print starts out by locating the actual physical card from the Topps’ archives and then painstakingly re-mastering the artwork with a team of designers. Every aspect of the print is designed to preserve the look and feel of the original card, from the printing pattern to the slightly worn edges.
I remember not being a big fan of the ’86 Topps set when it was printed (and I wasn’t the only one) but something about it now, in gigantic form, is appealing. Maybe it’s just nostalgia. Also, it would be interesting to see how the ’87 Topps set looks in a rec room with wood paneling.
Note the mock-up in the collection above that features New York Mets from the 1980s — the ’85 Mookie Wilson, ’86 Keith Hernandez and ’87 Gary Carter. Pretty sweet, though putting Hernandez next to furniture is kind of ironic, given that Seinfeld episode about asking people to help you move:

Posted under Mlb

Montreal renames street to honor Gary Carter (Big League Stew)

Catcher Gary Carter has already been immortalized in the Baseball Hall of Fame, but now he’s immortalized in Montreal too, where he used to star for the Expos.
At a Tuesday ceremony, Montreal officially renamed a street in his honor, or in this case, honour. Gary Carter Street will now replace Faillon Street West on Montreal maps. According to the Montreal Gazette , the street was chosen because it’s near the ex-Jarry Park Stadium, where the Expos played 1969-1976.
Carter, who died in 2012 from brain cancer at age 57, played for the Expos 1974-1984. He was a seven-time All-Star and MVP runner-up in 1980. He later played for the New York Mets, San Francisco Giants and Los Angeles Dodgers.
Gary Carter Street is the first of two namings in Montreal to honor Carter. Gary Carter baseball park is opening June 15. From the Gazette:
Little league teams from across Quebec are to participate in a series of baseball games for the park’s opening. Montreal sportscaster Rodger Brulotte, who will emcee Tuesday’s event, has been working on the park opening for months and described Carter as “legendary” among Quebec baseball fans.
While the Expos might be gone, it’s nice to know that Montreal will always remember “The Kid.”
Baseball is back. Don’t miss anything.
Follow @MikeOz and @bigleaguestew , on Twitter, along with the BLS Facebook page .

Posted under Mlb

‘Captain America’ David Wright could be named New York Mets captain too (Big League Stew)

What began as a kitschy nickname during the World Baseball Classic is on the verge of becoming a permanent rank for slugger David Wright.
Reporter Andy Martino of the New York Daily News has learned that the New York Mets want to make Wright the fourth captain in team history, following Keith Hernandez, Hall of Famer Gary Carter and John Franco. A few details are to be worked out — for example, Wright humbly wants to check with his teammates first, and he might want to heal from his ribcage injury before it becomes official — but if all goes as planned, Wright will get the designation sometime during the 2013 season.
Even though it sounds like a demotion — going from “Captain America” at the WBC to just “Captain of the Mets” — it’s really a much more meaningful distinction.

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In Memoriam: The baseball men we lost in 2012 (Big League Stew)

Though writing obituaries is never a fun or happy task, the Big League Stew crew tries our best to place the achievements of the departed in an appropriate and final place. We’ve listed excerpts from a few of our 2012 memorials below, while Baseball Almanac has  the whole list of baseball-related deaths from the year just past. May these men rest in peace.
Gary Carter, Hall of Fame catcher — Feb. 16 at age 57
Gary Carter just loved baseball so much. Someone gave him the nickname “The Kid” because he wore his joy and enthusiasm for the game on the sleeves of his uniforms. The Montreal Expos. The  New York Mets . The  San Francisco Giants . The  Los Angeles Dodgers . And Palm Beach Atlantic University, where he was the head coach. No matter where he was or what he was doing, it was obvious that Carter was in love with baseball.  — David Brown

Posted under Mlb

Gary Carter’s Harley Davidson Up For Charity Auction To Benefit Autism

Gary Carter is still giving back.

The Harley Davidson motorcycle owned by the Mets late, great Hall of Fame catcher will go on the auction block to benefit charity on the Steiner Sports ”Perfect 25th Anniversary Auction,” it was announced today.

The on-line auction at www.steinersports.com, which also includes Don Larsen’s Perfect Game uniform and Bob Knight’s NCAA championship rings, continues through December 5.

Carter’s widow Sandy had donated the sleek, black bike to the Autism Project of Palm Beach County (APPBC), which will receive all the proceeds.

The charity’s mission is to raise money to support two specialized charter schools in Palm Beach County.  C.J., the Carters’ grandson, attends Renaissance Learning Center, one of the charter schools. (RLC) serves children who are on the Autism Spectrum ages 3 to 14 years old.  Twelve years ago RLC had only five students enrolled, today enrollment has grown to 102 with a waiting list.

The 2004 V-Rod “100th Anniversary” model HD has 3,250 miles on its odometer, and is in pristine condition. Personally-owned accessories worn by Gary and Sandy will also be a part of this unique auction package, including leather jackets with “Kid” and “Sandy” embroidered inside, as well as helmets, boots, and gloves. The reserve has yet to be determined.

The bike was a gift to Carter from the New York Mets organization upon his induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame.

Posted under 100th Anniversary, Anniversary Model, Auction Package, Autism, Autism Project, Autism Spectrum, Baseball, Carters Grandson, catcher, Charity Auction, Charter Schools, collectibles, Don Larsen, Hall Of Fame, Harley Davidson, Harley Davidson Motorcycle, history, Lead Story, Line Auction, Mets, Ncaa Championship, New York Mets, Palm Beach County, Renaissance Learning, Steiner Sports, Today's News, Top Story, V Rod

Johan’s Masterpiece Is For All Of Met Nation

Somewhere in the great sports bar in the sky, Tug McGraw is screaming, “Ya Gotta Believe!” Gary Carter is acting like a maniac. Gil Hodges is nodding silently in approval.

And Casey Stengel is rubbing his leathery face, winking his eye and uttering, “Amazin’!”

When all is said and done, this was just a regular season game. One that put the Mets six games over the .500 mark, helping them to continue on with their surprising 2012.

Yet, this game meant more than that. This was the Mets last ghost exorcized. With 8,019 games played and no no-nos, you had to wonder if this was ever going to happen. The no-hitter is one of the hardest accomplishments in baseball, but with the slew of great pitchers that have come through the Met organization, just by sheer luck, someone would have thrown one by now.

On game 8,020 it happened. Johan Santana’s no-hitter gave the Flushing Faithful a moment in Mets history that will last a lifetime. This was the Miracle Mets, Game 6, and the Grand Slam Single. This was a moment you shared with your children or called your father as it was happening.

And just like those other great events in Mets history, you will remember where you were years from now and will share it with your children and grandchildren when other Mets throw their no-hitters.

It’s the type of event that binds Met fans together. Disillusioned over the past few seasons, this one game will probably bring back the fans, hoping that another glimpse of history will happen at Citi Field.

And if it wasn’t Tom Seaver or Doc Gooden or Jerry Koosman, it is perfect that Santana is the one to break the curse.

“Short of Tom Seaver, I can’t think of a better person to pitch the first one,” said third baseman David Wright. “The type of guy he is, the type of person he is, and what he’s been through last year – to come back and have that type of performance, that’s incredible and was glad to be a part of that. … I am thrilled I could be a part of it. It couldn’t happen to a better guy.

“It’s just an amazing story. I can let you know firsthand. I was there with him in Florida throughout some of his rehab last year. The work he put in, the time he put in to get himself back to this point. I thought his last start was special, but this start was just…I guess once every 51 years.”

When the Mets acquired Santana in 2008, he was supposed to lead the team back to the playoffs. It hasn’t happened yet. His shoulder surgery was supposed to end his career or at least make him a shell of his former self.

Instead, we are seeing the Johan of old – competing every game and fighting against every batter.

Of course like any no-hitter he had help. A fortunate foul ball at third base in the sixth and then a miracle-like catch by Mike Baxter, who grew up in the shadow of Shea Stadium,  in the seventh.

After that, you knew that it could happen. However, there were 8,019 reasons to believe the other shoe was going to drop.  But he continued to mow the Cardinals down, one by one until David Freese – last year’s World Series hero – became the answer to a Met trivia question by fishing for the signature changeup for strike three.

All of Met Nation rose to its feet in almost utter disbelief. Tears were coming out Terry Collins eyes, standing at the dugout just enjoying the moment, as the Mets celebrated on the field.

And the same cheers came throughout New York. From houses to sports bars a certain relief was felt. You could hear it in the voices of the announcers – Gary Cohen and Howie Rose – Met fans from their youth and the voices of this generation.  And the 27,69 who actually were at the game, went into a frenzy.

Somewhere in the great sports bar in the sky, Bob Murphy is giving his happy recap, while Mrs. Payson was  in her usual seat watching the Mets. Lindsey Nelson was in his sports coat getting reaction from Tommie Agee and Donn Clendenon.

It was a night for all Met fans to celebrate, because on game 8,020 the curse was broken.

Amazin’!

Posted under Amazin, Better Person, David Wright, Doc Gooden, Game One, Gil Hodges, Great Sports, Jerry Koosman, Joe Mcdonald, Johan Santana, Leathery Face, New York Mets, Sheer Luck, Six Games, Tom Seaver, Top Story, Tug Mcgraw

This post was written by Joe McDonald on June 2, 2012

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Canadiens honor Gary Carter with pregame tribute (AP)

In a city where hockey rules, Montreal Expos catcher Gary Carter was as popular as the beloved Canadiens. Carter died of brain cancer Thursday at age 57, and the Canadiens honored the baseball Hall of Famer — nicknamed “Kid” — with a five-minute video set to The Eagles’ “New Kid in Town” before a 3-1 loss to the New Jersey Devils on Sunday night.

Posted under Mlb

Catch The Rising Star

It was rather fitting that Channel 9 had a theme song for the Mets in 1985, called “Catch the Rising Stars.”

The country sounding tune was a intended for the young Mets like Dwight Gooden and Darryl Strawberry, but in reality the Mets wanted you to catch their brightest star Gary Carter.

The Hall of Fame catcher died today after a about a nine month bout with brain cancer. Although he played on the Mets for just five years – and mainly as his prime was fading – his impact was felt throughout, not only the organization, but all of Mets Nation.

“No one loved the game of baseball more than Gary Carter,” said fellow Hall of Famer Tom Seaver in a statement released by the Mets. “No one enjoyed playing the game of baseball more than Gary Carter. He wore his heart on his sleeve every inning he played. He gave you 110 percent and played the most grueling position on the field and that was something special.”

The loudest cheers at the Rangers games tonight were for Carter, who received a standing ovation from the crowd when his passing was announced, while the Montreal Canadiens paid tribute to his time playing north of the border.

All of this for one of the best catchers of his generation. Carter was the final piece to the puzzle, acquired in December, 1984 for four players, to make the Mets into a champion.

“The genesis of the trade was that we wanted to add a big bat to the lineup,” said former Mets GM Frank Cashen in a statement. “He did that right away, but perhaps more importantly was the way he handled our young pitchers. He was the perfect guy for so many reasons.”

“I relied on Gary for everything when I was on the mound including location, what pitch to throw and when,” Doc Gooden said in a statement. “Even when I didn’t have my best stuff, he found a way to get me through the game. He was just a warrior on the field.”

When he came to the Mets, he made the Mets stable of young talented pitchers into stars. He elevated Gooden’s game in 1985, so he had one of the best seasons in the history of baseball and forced Ron Darling and Sid Fernandez to pitch inside, something the young pitchers were shy to do the year before.

Then there was his presence at the plate. Carter made the Mets lineup complete. With George Foster making the Jason Bay signing look good, the team needed a right handed hitting cleanup hitter. That was Carter, who provided protection for Keith Hernandez and took pressure off of Darryl Strawberry, allowing the mercurial right fielder to develop.

With the trade, the stage was set and Carter shined on the biggest. On opening day in 1985, Carter hit a walk off homer off former Met Neil Allen to star off his career and let’s not forget his walk off hit in Game 5 of the 1986 NLCS or his two home runs in Game 4 of the World Series at Fenway Park.

And let’s not forget the rally in the 10th inning of Game 6 at Shea Stadium.

“I didn’t want to make the last out and I always maintained the theory – it’s not over ‘til it’s over,” Carter would say back in 2004. “I just went up there with the feeling of confidence and doing the best I possibly could and I was able to come through. Then Kevin Mitchell followed and then Ray Knight. Before you know it the ball went through Buckner’s legs and we had won Game 6. To me, I just go up there and remember my career. It was never a grind. It was an enjoyment. It’s amazing to think 18 years and how quickly it passed. I just went up there and said there was no way we should lose this World Series. I did everything to keep us alive.”

All during that time, Carter was the Met who had the biggest smile in the biggest market. If he was on your team, you loved him and if you rooted for another club, you hated him.

Simply put he was the symbol of the Mets in the 1980s and not a rising star but the one the shined the brightest.

He will be missed.

Posted under Brain Cancer, Brightest Star, Channel 9, Darryl Strawberry, Doc Gooden, Dwight Gooden, Fellow Hall, Frank Cashen, Hall Of Fame, Joe Mcdonald, Mets Gm, Montreal Canadiens, New York Mets, Pitchers, Playing The Game, Rising Star, Standing Ovation, Tom Seaver, Top Story

This post was written by Joe McDonald on February 17, 2012

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Hall of Fame Catcher Gary Carter Dead at 57

The baseball world is mourning the passing of Gary Carter. The 57 year old former catcher died from brain cancer on Thursday, February 16.  An announcement was made by his daughter, Kimmy Bloomers on the website of his family at 4:10 pm.

In May 2011, it was publicly revealed that the baseball great had been diagnosed with brain cancer. Carter had been undergoing treatment for the disease since its discovery. In the third week of January, it was announced that Carter’s condition had worsened as additional tumors were found.

Despite the reality of his worsened health, Carter recently made a visit to his players at Palm Beach Atlantic University where he served as baseball coach for the past two years.

The Baseball Writers’ of America (BBWAA) awarded Carter its Milton/Arthur Richman Good Guy Award at its annual dinner in New York on January 21. As Carter was unable to travel from Florida to accept the honor, Carter’s award was accepted by his son, D.J. who read his father’s speech.

The speech was a testimonial to Carter’s feelings and connection to New York City, “I’ll always have a special place in my heart for the people and city of New York. I have nothing but fond memories of my time here in New York, highly lighted, of course, with the World Series championship in 1986. I still remember the feeling of riding in the World Series parade with over one million people lining the streets to celebrate our championship. The fans were always supportive of me and my family since my diagnosis of brain cancer in May of 2011.”

Although, Carter only played in New York with the Mets for five of his 19 seasons, those years are well remembered by the fans in New York. Carter was obtained before the 1985 season after playing a decade with the Montreal Expos, where he was one of the team’s most popular players.

Although “The Kid” was 31 years old when he came to the Mets and his personality and lifestyle did not mesh smoothly with some of the more raucous men on the squad, he was a vital part of the successful team. The Mets were World Series champs in Carter’s second year in New York. Carter contributed mightily to that World Series victory with nine runs batted in.

Large numbers of New York baseball fans, whether of the Mets or Yankees, remember with great fondness and respect, Carter’s outstanding years in the city. Lifelong Yankees fans Bill Stimers said of the Kid, “Carter turned the 1986 World Series around. He was a great player and a very fine person. We will always miss him. We pray for his family.”

Carter’s eventful years in New York ended as did the 80’s. He played the next two seasons in the state of his birth, California. He was with the San Francisco Giants in 1990 and in 1991 he played with the Los Angeles Dodgers.

He concluded his outstanding career in the majors in 1992 with the organization that drafted him 20 years earlier, the Montreal Expos. Carter once recalled his career’s end in Montreal, “It was a good way for my career to end going back to the team where my career originated.”

Carter performed admirably during two decades as a major leaguer. He scored 1,025 runs and hit safely 2,092 times in 2,296 games. The dependable power hitter blasted 324 homers and drove in 1,225 runs.

His impressive stats were not compiled through longevity alone but by his outstanding play on a yearly basis. In his rookie season, Carter was runner-up to hurler John Montefusco in the voting for the NL Rookie-of-the Year. The catcher was a National League All-Star in 11 seasons. His hitting earned him the Silver Slugger five times. His ability behind the plate was rewarded with a Gold Glove for three seasons.

The achievements of Carter’s career in baseball were rewarded by a place in the pantheon of heroes in Cooperstown, New York. Carter was inducted into the baseball Hall of Fame in the summer of 2003. He is the only player inducted into the HOF wearing an expos cap.

The devoted family man is survived by Sandy, his wife of my than 30 years, and three children, Christy, Kimmy and DJ.

Posted under Annual Dinner, Baseball Coach, Baseball World, Baseball Writers, Bbwaa, Bloomers, Brain Cancer, Fond Memories, Hall Of Fame, Mets, New York Mets, One Million, Place In My Heart, Richman, Series Parade, Top Story, Undergoing Treatment

The NY Sports Day Interview: Gary Carter

Editors Note: This interview was conducted on August 4, 2004 and NYSD is reprinting it after the passing of Gary Carter today.

Back in 1989, I was a freshman in college and went to an early April game at Shea Stadium. After New York lost to the Phillies, my buddies and I waited by the player’s entrance for the Mets to come out. Car after car sped out of the lot – Darryl Strawberry almost hit someone – but we waited. Finally, when it looked like there was no one left and we were going to leave, a car stopped and Gary Carter rolled down the window. He signed autographs and answered some questions for the faithful who waited.

I mentioned that story to Carter after I interviewed him last week at Keyspan Park. He smiled and said, “It seems that those times haven’t changed. I was outside for 20 minutes earlier tonight doing the same thing.”

That is what the Hall of Famer is about. He is a man who gets it. Besides the stellar numbers, the Kid takes care of his many fans, which many players do not these days. The former catcher didn’t have to do this interview, but he did and it gave me a great thrill to interview one of my favorite players from my youth. So here is the NY Sports Day interview with Gary Carter as we discuss his time with the Mets, Montreal and his future in managing.

NY Sports Day: Are you going to be managing Brooklyn next season?

Gary Carter: I don’t know that. The reason is that it was asked me if would I be possibly available. But that doesn’t mean that’s where it’s going to be for next year. (The Mets) are just trying to get all their ducks in a row and they will make the decision. They know that I am interested in managing and it’s going to be somewhere. I just can’t say exactly where.

NYSD: So when you start managing, what skipper in your past will you style your managerial style after?

GC: I think everybody has their own style. I like Dusty Baker and all the managers I played for were all instrumental in providing an opportunity for myself. The biggest thing is that each one was different. Gene Mauch was a hard-nosed disciplinarian. Bob Kehoe, my minor league manager, was a great guy and was wonderful. He was a different type of manager than Mauch was. Each guy I learned different things from.

To be a manager, there is a lot that goes on because you are handling 25 guys and 25 different personalities. I think it’s also important to surround yourself with very good coaches. This organization has a bunch to choose from. I don’t know who they would want to be with me or whatever. My whole purpose is to help the organization to win. That is really what the bottom line is. If it eventually works out to be at the Major League level, the game has changed.

All I would want from any player is to go out and play hard; keep it fun; try to be enthusiastic and make it so that each game is a new game. You try to avoid the slumps and tough times, but a lot has to do with the makeup of the team. I think the manager has a lot to do with the make-up of the team. You want to create some discipline, but you also want to be able to create a winning atmosphere. Keep everybody up. That is very difficult for 162 games or down in the minor leagues it’s 140 games. It is basically a situation that day in and day out, you want to stay on top of things and keep all the players inspired. I think that is really the biggest part for the manager. And then you have attending to the press, the fans and everybody else. If you got a good pitching coach, you allow your pitching coach to handle the pitchers. If you have a good hitting instructor and all the other coaches – there is about six coaches on the Major League level – and you allow them to do their jobs. If they do their jobs, it makes it a lot more easier on the manager.

NYSD: Back when you were playing with the Mets, can you give me your top five moments?

GC: First of all would be winning the ‘86 World Series. Second one would be my very first game in a Met uniform and hitting a walk off home run against the Cardinals and Neil Allen. I would also have to say that ‘88 was also a very special year. Unfortunately losing out to the Dodgers who went on to win the World Series. That was another year we should have won, but ‘88 was a great year. I would have to say my last at-bat at Shea Stadium where I got a double off John Franco when he was with the Reds. I got a standing ovation because there was speculation that I would probably be gone at the end of the year. And probably my return to Shea honoring me for being inducted into the Hall of Fame- that coinciding being inducted into the Mets Hall of Fame.

NYSD: When you started the rally in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series. What was going through your mind at that particular at-bat?

GC: What was going through my mind was that I didn’t want to be a trivia question – that’s kidding. I didn’t want to make the last out and I always maintained the theory – it’s not over ‘til it’s over. I just went up there with the feeling of confidence and doing the best I possibly could and I was able to come through. Then Kevin Mitchell followed and then Ray Knight. Before you know it the ball went through Buckner’s legs and we had won Game 6. To me, I just go up there and remember my career. It was never a grind. It was an enjoyment. It’s amazing to think 18 years and how quickly it passed. I just went up there and said there was no way we should lose this World Series. I did everything to keep us alive.

NYSD: In the ‘86 playoffs you won Game 5 off Charlie Kerfeld. You were in a really bad slump. Did you do anything different in that at-bat compared to the rest of the series?

GC: No and I didn’t think I did anything different that entire series. It was just one of those things. Facing a guy like Mike Scott, who was tough as nails and cheating his ass off, I couldn’t hit him. They had a couple of other good pitchers. Nolan Ryan. Bob Knepper was throwing good. The relievers were outstanding. It was one of those series. When they walked Keith Hernandez to pitch to me, I got a little bit of vengeance by being able to come back and drive the ball up the middle.

NYSD: When you were in Montreal, what was your favorite moment being a Montreal Expo?

GC: There were a lot of great moments. When we won the second half (in 1981) and clinched it at Shea Stadium, knowing we were going to the playoffs for the first time playing the Phillies. Also the ‘81 All-Star game, when I chosen by the fans. I got my first starting role. That’s an individual thing. There is nothing better when you win. I remember us being in a pennant race in ‘79 and ‘80. To me that’s what it was all about. When we finally got to the playoffs; played the Phillies – beat them – and then lost it to the Dodgers, it was frustrating. Montreal gave me my opportunity. My very first game was against the Mets. I remember my first hit was off Jon Matlack and my second hit was off Tom Seaver. Everything else was golden after that. Once you get to the Big Leagues, that’s everybody’s dream and once it happens you want it to continue. You want it to continue forever. Sometimes all good things come to an end.

It ended in ‘92 for me, but that’s why am anxious to get back in the game full time. I love it. I have a great passion for it and would love to see the kids of today be successful.

NYSD: What was your reaction when you got the call from Jack O’Connell from the Hall of Fame?

GC: Overwhelmed, thrilled, relieved, all of the above. It was six-year wait and finally ended on a good note. I called all my family member and the first one was my father. Unfortunately 18 days later he passed away. At least he knew I was in. My father was my coach and he played both roles after my mom passed away. I was just glad it happened when it did.

NYSD: Do you think that one day your No. 8 will be retired by the Mets?

GC: I don’t know that. I say we may have to win another championship or two. We’ll see.

NYSD: You seemed like a natural for the broadcast booth and you were one after you retired. Why did you stop?

GC: Well, I just didn’t get fulfillment out of it, like I do with coaching. I love working with the players. It seems like they are very receptive of it. I love to see the progress and I love to see a lot of things. The broadcasting was only going to be a temporary thing. I did four years with the Marlins and three years with the Expos. I really wanted to see if that was what I wanted to do, but I didn’t get the enjoyment of coming to the ballpark and strapping the uniform on.

The (other) reason I also did it was my family. It gave me the opportunity to coach my daughter in high school. It also allowed me to stay at home and I didn’t have to move my family. Now I have been out of the game 12 years. I have been fulfilled the last four years as a roving catching instructor and I enjoy it immensely. My kids have grown now. I have been to their weddings. I have been at all their graduations. I saw my daughter play at Florida State and all those things. Now, it’s time to move on.

NYSD: How are your knees? Are you having another operation?

GC: Nine times and I am having my left knee done August 12th and my ankle. I tore a ligament in my ankle July 4th. I am having my right knee replaced. Other than that they are doing wonderful. (smiles).

NYSD: Gary, thank you very much. It’s been a thrill.

 

Posted under August 4, Autographs, Brooklyn, Buddies, Darryl Strawberry, Ducks In A Row, Dusty Baker, Freshman, Gc, Interview One, Keyspan, Managerial Style, Mets, New York Mets, Nysd, Phillies, Shea Stadium, Top Story

This post was written by Joe McDonald on February 17, 2012

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