Audio: Wright Gets Pulled For Protection

After Ryan Braun got hot by D.J. Carasco, Mets manager Terry Collins pinch hit for David Wright leading off the bottom of the seventh inning. Wright had two of the Mets’ hits off Zach Greinke, a double and a broken-bat single in the fourth inning.

But Collins did not want any retaliation against his star player, which set off some controversy in the dugout and after the game.

David Wright

Terry Collins

D.J. Carrasco

Dillon Gee

Posted under Bob Lazzari, Carasco, Controversy, David Wright, Dillon, Dugout, Game David, Mets, Mp3 Audio, New York Mets, Retaliation, Ryan Braun, Seventh Inning, Star Player, Top Story, Zach Greinke

This post was written by Bob Trainor on May 16, 2012

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Audio: Mets Walk Off to 4-0

Daniel Murphy’s walk off single completed a Mets comeback over the Washington Nationals by a score of 4-3. The game was highlighted by Mike Pelfrey’s 5 2/3s inning effort and rook Kirk Nieuwenhuis’s first career home run into the Mo’s Zone.

Below is Bob Trainor’s audio.

Kirk Nieuwenhuis

Mike Baxter

Mike Pelfrey

Ian Desmond

Davey Johnson

 

Posted under Bob Lazzari, Daniel Murphy, Mets, Mike Baxter, Mike Pelfrey, Mp3 Audio, Nbsp, New York Mets, Rook, Score Game, Top Story, Trainor, Washington Nationals

This post was written by Bob Trainor on April 10, 2012

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Hall of Fame Catcher Gary Carter Dead at 57

The baseball world is mourning the passing of Gary Carter. The 57 year old former catcher died from brain cancer on Thursday, February 16.  An announcement was made by his daughter, Kimmy Bloomers on the website of his family at 4:10 pm.

In May 2011, it was publicly revealed that the baseball great had been diagnosed with brain cancer. Carter had been undergoing treatment for the disease since its discovery. In the third week of January, it was announced that Carter’s condition had worsened as additional tumors were found.

Despite the reality of his worsened health, Carter recently made a visit to his players at Palm Beach Atlantic University where he served as baseball coach for the past two years.

The Baseball Writers’ of America (BBWAA) awarded Carter its Milton/Arthur Richman Good Guy Award at its annual dinner in New York on January 21. As Carter was unable to travel from Florida to accept the honor, Carter’s award was accepted by his son, D.J. who read his father’s speech.

The speech was a testimonial to Carter’s feelings and connection to New York City, “I’ll always have a special place in my heart for the people and city of New York. I have nothing but fond memories of my time here in New York, highly lighted, of course, with the World Series championship in 1986. I still remember the feeling of riding in the World Series parade with over one million people lining the streets to celebrate our championship. The fans were always supportive of me and my family since my diagnosis of brain cancer in May of 2011.”

Although, Carter only played in New York with the Mets for five of his 19 seasons, those years are well remembered by the fans in New York. Carter was obtained before the 1985 season after playing a decade with the Montreal Expos, where he was one of the team’s most popular players.

Although “The Kid” was 31 years old when he came to the Mets and his personality and lifestyle did not mesh smoothly with some of the more raucous men on the squad, he was a vital part of the successful team. The Mets were World Series champs in Carter’s second year in New York. Carter contributed mightily to that World Series victory with nine runs batted in.

Large numbers of New York baseball fans, whether of the Mets or Yankees, remember with great fondness and respect, Carter’s outstanding years in the city. Lifelong Yankees fans Bill Stimers said of the Kid, “Carter turned the 1986 World Series around. He was a great player and a very fine person. We will always miss him. We pray for his family.”

Carter’s eventful years in New York ended as did the 80’s. He played the next two seasons in the state of his birth, California. He was with the San Francisco Giants in 1990 and in 1991 he played with the Los Angeles Dodgers.

He concluded his outstanding career in the majors in 1992 with the organization that drafted him 20 years earlier, the Montreal Expos. Carter once recalled his career’s end in Montreal, “It was a good way for my career to end going back to the team where my career originated.”

Carter performed admirably during two decades as a major leaguer. He scored 1,025 runs and hit safely 2,092 times in 2,296 games. The dependable power hitter blasted 324 homers and drove in 1,225 runs.

His impressive stats were not compiled through longevity alone but by his outstanding play on a yearly basis. In his rookie season, Carter was runner-up to hurler John Montefusco in the voting for the NL Rookie-of-the Year. The catcher was a National League All-Star in 11 seasons. His hitting earned him the Silver Slugger five times. His ability behind the plate was rewarded with a Gold Glove for three seasons.

The achievements of Carter’s career in baseball were rewarded by a place in the pantheon of heroes in Cooperstown, New York. Carter was inducted into the baseball Hall of Fame in the summer of 2003. He is the only player inducted into the HOF wearing an expos cap.

The devoted family man is survived by Sandy, his wife of my than 30 years, and three children, Christy, Kimmy and DJ.

Posted under Annual Dinner, Baseball Coach, Baseball World, Baseball Writers, Bbwaa, Bloomers, Brain Cancer, Fond Memories, Hall Of Fame, Mets, New York Mets, One Million, Place In My Heart, Richman, Series Parade, Top Story, Undergoing Treatment

The NY Sports Day Interview: Gary Carter

Editors Note: This interview was conducted on August 4, 2004 and NYSD is reprinting it after the passing of Gary Carter today.

Back in 1989, I was a freshman in college and went to an early April game at Shea Stadium. After New York lost to the Phillies, my buddies and I waited by the player’s entrance for the Mets to come out. Car after car sped out of the lot – Darryl Strawberry almost hit someone – but we waited. Finally, when it looked like there was no one left and we were going to leave, a car stopped and Gary Carter rolled down the window. He signed autographs and answered some questions for the faithful who waited.

I mentioned that story to Carter after I interviewed him last week at Keyspan Park. He smiled and said, “It seems that those times haven’t changed. I was outside for 20 minutes earlier tonight doing the same thing.”

That is what the Hall of Famer is about. He is a man who gets it. Besides the stellar numbers, the Kid takes care of his many fans, which many players do not these days. The former catcher didn’t have to do this interview, but he did and it gave me a great thrill to interview one of my favorite players from my youth. So here is the NY Sports Day interview with Gary Carter as we discuss his time with the Mets, Montreal and his future in managing.

NY Sports Day: Are you going to be managing Brooklyn next season?

Gary Carter: I don’t know that. The reason is that it was asked me if would I be possibly available. But that doesn’t mean that’s where it’s going to be for next year. (The Mets) are just trying to get all their ducks in a row and they will make the decision. They know that I am interested in managing and it’s going to be somewhere. I just can’t say exactly where.

NYSD: So when you start managing, what skipper in your past will you style your managerial style after?

GC: I think everybody has their own style. I like Dusty Baker and all the managers I played for were all instrumental in providing an opportunity for myself. The biggest thing is that each one was different. Gene Mauch was a hard-nosed disciplinarian. Bob Kehoe, my minor league manager, was a great guy and was wonderful. He was a different type of manager than Mauch was. Each guy I learned different things from.

To be a manager, there is a lot that goes on because you are handling 25 guys and 25 different personalities. I think it’s also important to surround yourself with very good coaches. This organization has a bunch to choose from. I don’t know who they would want to be with me or whatever. My whole purpose is to help the organization to win. That is really what the bottom line is. If it eventually works out to be at the Major League level, the game has changed.

All I would want from any player is to go out and play hard; keep it fun; try to be enthusiastic and make it so that each game is a new game. You try to avoid the slumps and tough times, but a lot has to do with the makeup of the team. I think the manager has a lot to do with the make-up of the team. You want to create some discipline, but you also want to be able to create a winning atmosphere. Keep everybody up. That is very difficult for 162 games or down in the minor leagues it’s 140 games. It is basically a situation that day in and day out, you want to stay on top of things and keep all the players inspired. I think that is really the biggest part for the manager. And then you have attending to the press, the fans and everybody else. If you got a good pitching coach, you allow your pitching coach to handle the pitchers. If you have a good hitting instructor and all the other coaches – there is about six coaches on the Major League level – and you allow them to do their jobs. If they do their jobs, it makes it a lot more easier on the manager.

NYSD: Back when you were playing with the Mets, can you give me your top five moments?

GC: First of all would be winning the ‘86 World Series. Second one would be my very first game in a Met uniform and hitting a walk off home run against the Cardinals and Neil Allen. I would also have to say that ‘88 was also a very special year. Unfortunately losing out to the Dodgers who went on to win the World Series. That was another year we should have won, but ‘88 was a great year. I would have to say my last at-bat at Shea Stadium where I got a double off John Franco when he was with the Reds. I got a standing ovation because there was speculation that I would probably be gone at the end of the year. And probably my return to Shea honoring me for being inducted into the Hall of Fame- that coinciding being inducted into the Mets Hall of Fame.

NYSD: When you started the rally in Game 6 of the 1986 World Series. What was going through your mind at that particular at-bat?

GC: What was going through my mind was that I didn’t want to be a trivia question – that’s kidding. I didn’t want to make the last out and I always maintained the theory – it’s not over ‘til it’s over. I just went up there with the feeling of confidence and doing the best I possibly could and I was able to come through. Then Kevin Mitchell followed and then Ray Knight. Before you know it the ball went through Buckner’s legs and we had won Game 6. To me, I just go up there and remember my career. It was never a grind. It was an enjoyment. It’s amazing to think 18 years and how quickly it passed. I just went up there and said there was no way we should lose this World Series. I did everything to keep us alive.

NYSD: In the ‘86 playoffs you won Game 5 off Charlie Kerfeld. You were in a really bad slump. Did you do anything different in that at-bat compared to the rest of the series?

GC: No and I didn’t think I did anything different that entire series. It was just one of those things. Facing a guy like Mike Scott, who was tough as nails and cheating his ass off, I couldn’t hit him. They had a couple of other good pitchers. Nolan Ryan. Bob Knepper was throwing good. The relievers were outstanding. It was one of those series. When they walked Keith Hernandez to pitch to me, I got a little bit of vengeance by being able to come back and drive the ball up the middle.

NYSD: When you were in Montreal, what was your favorite moment being a Montreal Expo?

GC: There were a lot of great moments. When we won the second half (in 1981) and clinched it at Shea Stadium, knowing we were going to the playoffs for the first time playing the Phillies. Also the ‘81 All-Star game, when I chosen by the fans. I got my first starting role. That’s an individual thing. There is nothing better when you win. I remember us being in a pennant race in ‘79 and ‘80. To me that’s what it was all about. When we finally got to the playoffs; played the Phillies – beat them – and then lost it to the Dodgers, it was frustrating. Montreal gave me my opportunity. My very first game was against the Mets. I remember my first hit was off Jon Matlack and my second hit was off Tom Seaver. Everything else was golden after that. Once you get to the Big Leagues, that’s everybody’s dream and once it happens you want it to continue. You want it to continue forever. Sometimes all good things come to an end.

It ended in ‘92 for me, but that’s why am anxious to get back in the game full time. I love it. I have a great passion for it and would love to see the kids of today be successful.

NYSD: What was your reaction when you got the call from Jack O’Connell from the Hall of Fame?

GC: Overwhelmed, thrilled, relieved, all of the above. It was six-year wait and finally ended on a good note. I called all my family member and the first one was my father. Unfortunately 18 days later he passed away. At least he knew I was in. My father was my coach and he played both roles after my mom passed away. I was just glad it happened when it did.

NYSD: Do you think that one day your No. 8 will be retired by the Mets?

GC: I don’t know that. I say we may have to win another championship or two. We’ll see.

NYSD: You seemed like a natural for the broadcast booth and you were one after you retired. Why did you stop?

GC: Well, I just didn’t get fulfillment out of it, like I do with coaching. I love working with the players. It seems like they are very receptive of it. I love to see the progress and I love to see a lot of things. The broadcasting was only going to be a temporary thing. I did four years with the Marlins and three years with the Expos. I really wanted to see if that was what I wanted to do, but I didn’t get the enjoyment of coming to the ballpark and strapping the uniform on.

The (other) reason I also did it was my family. It gave me the opportunity to coach my daughter in high school. It also allowed me to stay at home and I didn’t have to move my family. Now I have been out of the game 12 years. I have been fulfilled the last four years as a roving catching instructor and I enjoy it immensely. My kids have grown now. I have been to their weddings. I have been at all their graduations. I saw my daughter play at Florida State and all those things. Now, it’s time to move on.

NYSD: How are your knees? Are you having another operation?

GC: Nine times and I am having my left knee done August 12th and my ankle. I tore a ligament in my ankle July 4th. I am having my right knee replaced. Other than that they are doing wonderful. (smiles).

NYSD: Gary, thank you very much. It’s been a thrill.

 

Posted under August 4, Autographs, Brooklyn, Buddies, Darryl Strawberry, Ducks In A Row, Dusty Baker, Freshman, Gc, Interview One, Keyspan, Managerial Style, Mets, New York Mets, Nysd, Phillies, Shea Stadium, Top Story

This post was written by Joe McDonald on February 17, 2012

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Mets Get To Mo and Win in 10th

The final three games of the cross-town New York interleague Subway Series with the Mets and Yankees centered on the shortstops. The Yankees Derek Jeter was rehabbing in Trenton for his return Monday in Cleveland. His backup, Eduardo Nunez had to sit down Sunday with a tight right hamstring after going 7-for-8 in two games with a homer and three doubles.

And then there was the Mets’ Jose Reyes who earlier was elected to start at short for the National League in the All-Star game July 12th. Diagnosed with tightness and a Grade-1 strain of his left hamstring, Reyes watched as Yankees shortstop Ramiro Pena, filling in for Nunez, made an error in the ninth that would enable the Mets to eventually score and tie their game with the Yankees.

And it was Pena, with his second error of the game with two outs that set up Jason Bay to get his fourth career walk-off hit in the 10th, as the Mets managed to avoid being swept by the Yankees with a 3-2 win with many of the 41,513 fans still in attendance at Citi Field.

It was that type of series for the Yankees and Mets with shortstop issues, and the Yankees winning the season series 4-2. Both concluded their interleague play portion of the schedule, the Yankees going 13-5, the Mets 9-9. The Yankees head to Cleveland for a brief three-game series and the Mets to the west coast for a road trip to Los Angeles and San Francisco before the All-Star break.

And they hope their starting shortstops will be available to conclude the first half of the season. “Just a little bit of a strain, I mean nothing big,” commented Reyes who sat on the bench and watched as Bay got the winning hit off Yankees losing pitcher Luis Ayala (1-2). “I know we’re going to take it one day at a time and see what happens. But it’s real good news. Today when I got up I felt even better than yesterday so that’s very good news.”

However, Mets manager Terry Collins is being cautious. Reyes, who leads baseball in hitting, hits, multi-hit games and triples, will want to play and not miss the All-Star game, his 12th. He, in essence is a leading candidate for the National League MVP and no doubt a catalyst and most valuable player for the Mets. ”The doctors did not want him to play today and we will take this one day at a time,” said Collins. The manager also said Reyes was making the five-hour trip to Los Angeles and it all depends on how his shortstop feels before making a determination for Monday.

The Yankees were 46-1 this season when leading after eight, primarily because of their bullpen and The Mets, 1-35 after eight. But that seemed to mean nothing when Mariano Rivera tried to close the door in a tight game. Prior to the ninth, Yankees starter Freddy Garcia handled the Mets for seven innings. On a full count with two outs Bay walked and went to third on a Lucas Duda single. He came home with the tying run when Ronnie Paulino got hold of a 1-2 Rivera pitch and hit the ball through the right side.

It may have been the best game for Bay as a Met. He has not been productive and missed most of last season after sustaining a concussion going after a ball and hitting an outfield wall at Dodgers Stadium. “I’ve been through a lot of ups and downs,” commented Bay about the walk and game winning hit. “It was nice, A, to be in that spot, and B, to come through. It was great.”

Coillins, in particular could have not been happier for Bay and his team. “I just said, ‘nice going’”, he said when greeting Bay after the game. “It’s nice to see this guy smile. Nobody cares more to help this team than Jason Bay does. And about his team showing resiliency, “They play, they take blows and just come back.”

The Mets broke a three game slide. The Yankees had their seven-game winning streak stopped. But there was concern for Mets starter R.A. Dickey who left after five innings due to tightness in his left buttock area. General Manager Sandy Alderson expects Dickey to make his next start, but as always with the Mets, especially after a win against the Yankees, there had to be something to calm the optimism.

“It’s a big relief,” said outfielder Carlos Beltran, regarding the news about Reyes possibly not being out for the long run. Beltran also was elected to play for the National League All-Stars and said it all about Reyes. “We depend so much on him.”

Notes: Angel Pagan went 0-for-10 in the series and let a ball get hit by Robinson Cano get by him in the 10th that went for a triple. Francisco Rodriguez was able to strand two that got the Mets to their half of the inning….It was Rivera’s fourth blown save of the season and he was also selected for his 12th All-Star team…

The Yankees trailed and tied the game in the fifth with a Robinson Cano double, the first hit off Dickey and Nick Swisher got the RBI single…The start of the game was delayed for 89 minutes as rain was in the forecast, though not one drop fell until the seventh inning. Yankees manager Joe Girardi said, “It was a frustrating loss for us.”

Girardi complained that the delay did not give enough time for Garcia to warm up and he said it was miscommunication about the start time caused by the delay….The Yankees optioned right handed starter Ivan Nova to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes Barre setting up the return of righty Phil Hughes who was on the disabled list with shoulder inflammation. The justification, Nova would get more pitching time at Scranton because the Yankees would have no need for a six-man rotation…

The combined three-day crowd set a Citi Field attendance record of 125,575…Dickey was 5-0 in interleague starts since joining the Mets last season…Yankees got the 2-1 lead in the eighth with a Brett Gardner triple off Jason Isringhausen and sac fly RBI from Curtis Granderson.

e-mail Rich Mancuso: Ring786@aol.com

 

Posted under Better Than Yesterday, Cross Town, Day At A Time, Derek Jeter, Game Series, Interleague Play, Jason Bay, Jose Reyes, Luis Ayala, Mets, New York Mets, News Today, One Day At A Time, Ramiro Pena, Shortstops, Subway Series, Three Games, Top Story, Two Games

This post was written by Rich Mancuso on July 4, 2011

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Audio: The Mets Big Comeback

After being down 7-0 to the Pittsburgh pirates, the Mets yesterday rallied for nine unanswered runs to win a remarkable game 9-7. This comes on the heels of manager Terry Collins’s postgame explosion on Wednesday.

Ruben Tejada

Mike Pelfrey

Terry Collins

Posted under Audio Mp3, Bob Trainor, Explosion, Heels, Mets, Mike Pelfrey, Mp3 Audio, New York Mets, Pittsburgh Pirates, Remarkable Game, Ruben, Top Story, Www Mp3

This post was written by Bob Trainor on June 3, 2011

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Audio: Mets Lose a Heartbreaker

The Mets lost in 10 inning 7-6 on Aubrey Huff’s homer off Taylor Buchholz to the San Francisco Giants. Below is sound from Bob Trainor.

Aubrey Huff

Ryan Vogelsong

Taylor Buchholz

RA Dickey

Jose Reyes

Josh Thole

Posted under Bob Trainor, Game Mp3, Gants, Heartbreaker, Homer, Jose Reyes, Josh Thole, Lost, Mets, Mp3 Audio, New York Mets, Ra Dickey, Top Story, Trainor

This post was written by Bob Trainor on May 4, 2011

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Audio: Mets Break Losing Streak

The Mets finally bounced out of the funk and best the Astros 9-1. Terry Collins got tossed the second batter of the game. Chris Capuano pitched seven strong innings and David Wright broke out of his slump. Jason Bay finally returned after missing most of the first month of the season with a rib cage strain.

Here are Bob Trainor’s postgame sounds:

David Wright

Chris Capuano

Jason Bay

 

Posted under Bob Trainor, David Wright, Game Chris, Jason Bay, Losing Streak, Mets, Mp3 Audio, Nbsp, New York Mets, Sounds, Top Story, Trainor

This post was written by Bob Trainor on April 22, 2011

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Spring Cleaning

It is not even  10 percent into the 2011 season and it is already time to clean house.

It really never was a matter of if, but always a matter of when. You can change a number of things, but unless you change almost all of them you can’t change a losing atmosphere. It becomes like that movie the Blob. It engulfs everything, seeps into the air vents and fills every orifice. It can only be exorcised by freezing   or burning or blowing up  the whole damn thing.

They say even a losing playoff appearance often serves to give a young team experience and make  them stronger for the next year. In most cases that is true, and looked to be true for the  post 2006 Mets until epic collapses in 2007 and 2008 erased that and injected an already “loser” tagged franchise with the dreaded “choker” tag. In the same way playoff experience is supposed to help, an epic collapse can destroy a franchise  – for  years. Back to back collapses seals it in cement. Together, the core of this team can never get past it. Not in this lifetime. Not with basically 50 years of  losing  hanging over their  heads. Could anyone have ever expected the Cubs to overcome Bartman?? Was never going to happen and  everyone knew it.

Do we have to endure another  3 or 4  months of “we  were in every game”, “we battled”, or some  other form of incessant babbling like nobody realizes  losing by one run is actually  the same as losing by 10 runs in the standings,  If standings  are what  we really care  about. If what we actually care about is blowing smoke, then keep the atta boys coming.

If blowing the whole thing up and going in a different direction is the chosen path, then do it sooner rather  than later. It is what it is. Let’s stop sugar coating it and try to cash in. Let’s stop bringing back Chris Carters in trades.  Let’s start trying to maximize trades. Thank Depodesta for his efforts and then have him Fedex Eamus  back to Toronto,  with a  prepaid postage shipping label. Fire Warthen.

Bury Hairston and Harris on the bench where they belong. Then start dealing before it is too late.

Turn the tables on all the ½ year rental whiners. This gives potential trade partners a full, solid year of the player, on top of the  chance to resign them. This increases the value of a KROD, Reyes and Beltran even more so than trading them last year, as all were injured unknown quantities last year.

One of  the resident geniuses, Stark or Rubin was writing how valuable a few months of Fielder  would be to an AL team.  BECAUSE  he didn’t have to  be resigned. When it is a Met he has no value because his contract is up. When it is  a Met he has no value because he  is locked up for the next few years. Or has an option. When it is another player  in the league he HAS tremendous value BECAUSE  he is locked up for the next few years OR because he  has an option. Is anybody  else tired of  hearing  the same nonsense from the  same people  over  and  over and over.

Put the offers on the table and they will come.

KROD and PARNELL to Chisox for Sale and Beckham

BELTRAN and PAGAN to Boston for Bard and Ellsbury

WRIGHT to Philly for Hamels and Dominic Brown

REYES to SFN for Cain and …

 

That leaves nobody left from collapsing teams except Santana and he won’t have anyone to commiserate with if and when he  ever comes back. Still leaves the  likes of Bay, Niese and a cast of thousands of junk ball relief pitchers and/or not so  blue chip  prospects  we could try and package or use as filler. Try it. We might like it.

These trades are real doable trades and could possibly  net much more getting a few teams into bidding wars. It just has  to be done  right now, not in drips and drabs in June or September when you get nothing back.

Finally, was  a bit taken back trying to read a story from this JOE JANISCH – A BLOG GUY. He proceeded to rip  off  the entire first paragraph of our The MORE THINGS CHANGE  WITH NO  MENTION OF THE PREVIOUS ARTICLE FROM 2 WEEKS  EARLIER??

Thing s indeed  are rapidly falling apart.  Make the moves I am suggesting and make them all and make them now and the season will be saved. People will come to see Hamels, Cain, Bard and Sale pitch.They will pay to see Mejia develop iin the MLB rotation. They will salivate seeing Harvey and Holt continue to develop with Flores , Valdespin and all the OF prospects.

The Mets did show  that even if they could  turn this around with the players they got they may get to 75 wins and I am stretching. No need to go through the agony of the past few weeks 3 or 5 more times just to get there.

Posted under 4 Months, Air Vents, Atta, Blowing Smoke, Carters, Cement, Collapse, Collapses, Damn Thing, Fedex, Mets, Movie The Blob, New York Mets, Orifice, Playoff Appearance, Playoff Experience, Seeps, Spring Cleaning, Sugar Coating, Team Experience, Top Story

This post was written by Frank Salamone on April 18, 2011

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Audio: Mets Fall In Citi Opener

Bob Trainor of Trainor Communications was in the Met Clubhouse for the club’s 6-2 defeat to the Washington Nationals. R.A. Dickey wasn’t himself after suffering from a broken nail and the club couldn’t get the tying run home despite having numerous chances to do so. In the eighth, Washington opened up the game by scoring three runs.

The Reactions Are Below.

David Wright

Carlos Beltran

Jose Reyes

Josh Thole

Washington’s Tyler Clippard

R.A. Dickey

For More Info contact Bob at TrainorComm@gmail.com.

Posted under Beltron, Bob Trainor, Broken Nail, Carlos Beltran, Citi, Clubhouse, Contact Bob, David Wright, Game, Jose Reyes, Josh Thole, Met, Mets, Mp3 Audio, New York Mets, Top Story, Trainor, Washington Nationals, Washington Post

This post was written by Bob Trainor on April 9, 2011