Mets Honoring Chipper is a Joke

Ok, we are always for saluting the game’s greats. It’s what makes baseball what it is, but giving Chipper Jones a gift at a pre-game ceremony?

Oh come on.

If the Wilpons haven’t done enough to destroy the fanbase, this takes the cake. Do you really have to honor your personal tormentor for the last 15 years, the man who insulted the fans as a youth and then decided to use your pitching staff as personal batting practice?

Of course not. It makes no sense. The fans did not come out in droves last night to salute Chipper. And thankfully the Mets will get the message.

Because what’s next? Derek Jeter Day next year? Or how about Mariano Rivera Night?

The Jets never honored Dan Marino and the Giants never had a day for Troy Aikman.

I’m pretty sure you will never see a Mark Messier night at Nassau Coliseum or Reggie Miller getting an on the court tribute from the Knicks.

This is something the Onion would make up or go into an April Fools Issue.

But this really happened last night and there’s absolutely no reason for it.

Even Chipper agrees.

“I would respect the body of work,” Jones said, “but I would hate his guts.”

Maybe the Mets could add insult to injury by retiring No. 10 or even have John Rocker throw out the first ball.

It would be fitting the way this organization treated the fans over the years.

For his part Jones took it in all good fun and very gracious. And he did name his child Shea because of all the success he had at the Mets former ballpark.

And the Mets presented him with a 3-D painting of the old girl as a parting gift.

But let this be a one shot deal. There’s no need to have days for opposing players. Let Jeter have his day in the Bronx and Chase Utley be honored by the Phillies.

Maybe it would be a better idea the Mets honor some of their oversights over the years, like Jerry Koosman or retire No. 17 or No. 31 before giving gifts to other team’s payroll.

Posted under Batting Practice, Dan Marino, Derek Jeter, Droves, Giving Gifts, Insult To Injury, Jerry Koosman, Joe Mcdonald, Mariano Rivera, Nassau Coliseum, New York Mets, Parting Gift, Reggie Miller, Top Story, Tormentor

This post was written by Joe McDonald on September 8, 2012

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Mets Honoring Chipper is a Joke

Ok, we are always for saluting the game’s greats. It’s what makes baseball what it is, but giving Chipper Jones a gift at a pre-game ceremony?

Oh come on.

If the Wilpons haven’t done enough to destroy the fanbase, this takes the cake. Do you really have to honor your personal tormentor for the last 15 years, the man who insulted the fans as a youth and then decided to use your pitching staff as personal batting practice?

Of course not. It makes no sense. The fans did not come out in droves last night to salute Chipper. And thankfully the Mets will get the message.

Because what’s next? Derek Jeter Day next year? Or how about Mariano Rivera Night?

The Jets never honored Dan Marino and the Giants never had a day for Troy Aikman.

I’m pretty sure you will never see a Mark Messier night at Nassau Coliseum or Reggie Miller getting an on the court tribute from the Knicks.

This is something the Onion would make up or go into an April Fools Issue.

But this really happened last night and there’s absolutely no reason for it.

Even Chipper agrees.

“I would respect the body of work,” Jones said, “but I would hate his guts.”

Maybe the Mets could add insult to injury by retiring No. 10 or even have John Rocker throw out the first ball.

It would be fitting the way this organization treated the fans over the years.

For his part Jones took it in all good fun and very gracious. And he did name his child Shea because of all the success he had at the Mets former ballpark.

And the Mets presented him with a 3-D painting of the old girl as a parting gift.

But let this be a one shot deal. There’s no need to have days for opposing players. Let Jeter have his day in the Bronx and Chase Utley be honored by the Phillies.

Maybe it would be a better idea the Mets honor some of their oversights over the years, like Jerry Koosman or retire No. 17 or No. 31 before giving gifts to other team’s payroll.

Posted under April Fools, Batting Practice, Dan Marino, Derek Jeter, Droves, Giving Gifts, Insult To Injury, Jerry Koosman, Joe Mcdonald, John Rocker, Mariano Rivera, Mark Messier, Mark Messier Night, Nassau Coliseum, New York Mets, Parting Gift, Reggie Miller, Top Story, Tormentor, Troy Aikman

This post was written by Joe McDonald on September 8, 2012

Tags: , ,

McDonald: The Real Johan Santana is Back

Pitchers tend enjoy watching each other hit, so when Johan Santana took Matt Maloney deep last night for his first home run in – well – ever, the rest of the staff had to chime in.

“You tell him, he will never hit another one again,” laughed closer Frankie Rodriguez. “He grabbed a bat and was walking around the dugout saying he was going to hit one out.”

Of course with Santana leading the staff in home runs, other pitchers have to get their shot.

“As soon as he hit it, [Mike Pelfrey] ran in to the cage and started taking some extra batting practice,” deadpanned R.A. Dickey with the righthander in earshot and added, “So I have to hit one now, that’s how it works.”

The bottom line is that Santana finally found the formula to get himself back in the win column. As Jerry Koosman once said, “Shut them out and hit one out. Then you got yourself a win.”

And it seems like Santana needed the third home run to win this one, as the Mets still struggled to score runs. Only a fortunate sixth inning gave the ace some cushion in route to his sixth win of the year.

But it’s been like that for Santana all season. With very few runs behind him, he had no room for error. Unfortunately it meant he went through his rough patch in June, while the Mets were piling up the wins. But as the page turned to July it seemed to be Santana time.

He is 61-19 with a 2.73 ERA during the second half of the season. In 2008, he went 9-0 down the stretch and now it looks like he’s doing it again. Santana made a change in his arm angle, which is allowing his fastball a more explosive look, going back to the low-90s. Couple that with a change in his motion, which stopped tipping his pitches and you can see why he’s the Johan Santana of old.

“I am throwing my fastball much better,” Santana said. “And that makes my other pitches better.”

Especially his changeup, which is deadly.

“You saw hitters taking that changeup before,” said manager Jerry Manuel, “where tonight you saw it’s like he pulls the bat through the strike zone with that changeup.”

That’s why Manuel quickly retreated to the dugout with one out in the ninth and runners on first and second after Jason Bay’s error. The look on his ace’s face told the story.

“I’ll finish it,” he said.

And two pitches later he did ending an almost perfect night by the Mets ace.

Rodriguez may be right in that Santana may never hit another home run, but who cares? The most important thing is that the real Johan Santana is back.

Posted under Ace, Arm Angle, Batting Practice, Bottom Line, Changeup, Dugout, Earshot, Era, Fastball, Jerry Koosman, Joe Mcdonald, Johan Santana, Matt Maloney, Mcdonald, Mets, Mike Pelfrey, New York Mets, Pitchers, Rough Patch, Second Half, Sixth Inning, Tipping His Pitches, Top Story

This post was written by Joe McDonald on July 7, 2010